Thursday, October 15, 2015

CocksandCunts for Kaleidoscope Videoclub

I was honoured to curated a video project for Kaleidoscopemagazine to coincide with their Art and Sex issue (I've interviewed Celia Hempton in the mag itself and I'm also doing a talk at Frieze Art Fair Reading Room Friday 530pm with her and Julie Verhoeven)

It's called Cocksandcunts Here are more details!

The selected works by The ARKA group, Adham Faramawy, Richard Kern, Reija Merlainen, Julie Verhoeven, John Walter and Zoe Williams explore the representation of sexuality and the naked body, veering from fetishism to playful humour, from choreographed performance to an almost abstract approach. Here, ideas of feminism, movement, power and the structure of art manifest into a deeply human form, emphasizing the human sex as something layered with meaning.

PS Longlyst also printed my Top Ten London galleries

Sunday, October 11, 2015


My recommendations leading up to Frieze are up.

Also if you're there Friday, head to the reading room at 530pm to hear me talk with Celia Hempton and Julie Verhoeven for Kaleidoscope. I'll also be posting a VIDEOCLUB project to coincide next week. News to come!

Saturday, October 03, 2015

Hot off the press

Here is some of the latest work out at the moment

- the cover feature of the Financial Times How To Spend it Magazine

- a six page feature on artists working with poetry and text in Sleek magazine with profiles on David Raymond Conroy, Quinn Latimer, Megan Rooney, Harry Burke and Agnieszka Polska

- lots of top tens for Dazed Digital coming - Art Licks weekend, and pre and post Frieze and Fiac to come

Thursday, July 02, 2015



The performance programme is at the year’s edition of CHART works with demonstrating the vitality of colour and showing how it can be relevant, engaging and complex in a series of conceptual performance art works.

The diverse variety of performance artists is curated by the English curator, writer and editor Francesca Gavin. Gavin has primarily invited Nordic artists who work with different elements such as, architecture, sound, lighting and textile. The artists will create individual performances but are asked to work within the shared thematic of colour in creating their works.

Colour has a bad reputation. From the Grecian concepts of aesthetics though 20th century modernism to contemporary conceptual art, colour is often described as something about spectacle, emotion, expression, the irrational. The responses and experience colour creates in a viewer is often downplayed as simple sensationalism. This programme of performances aims to resist this redundant argument.

The performance programme of CHART draws on David Batchelor’s concept of ‘chromophobia’. He argues, “colour is made out to be the property of some ’foreign’ body – usually the feminine, the oriental, the primitive, the infantile, the vulgar, the queer or the pathological. Colour is relegated to the realm of the superficial, the supplementary, the inessential or the cosmetic… Colour is routinely excluded from the higher concerns of the Mind.”

The aim of these works is to reposition colour as something equally important as line, idea, and form in the creation of art. Show that colour is something important outside of the expected mediums of painting or graphics. That colour can be an intelligent way to engage with politics and meaning, and has an important role in contemporary cultural production and communication.
The artists in this programme will invited to draw on the idea of the spectrum or create a performance around a specific colour (so there could be an excitement amongst viewers to ‘collect’ the experience of different coloured performances).

FRIDAY the 21st of August

Norwegian artist Wrånes creates dramatic aural audio works. Featured in the Sydney biennial and the last Performa, her space-specific performance works that often use hanging elements, props, costume and architecture. For CHART, she will perform a “vision for the future”.

SATURDAY the 22nd of August

Sigurðardóttir’s work focuses on interactive spaces and projects that investigate the idea of the spectrum, space and movement. For CHART, the Icelandic artist will create a Prism performance-installation working with colour as visual information gained from scans of viewers invisible radiant energy.

David Mullett & Duncan Ransom
Director David Mullett is unveiling his first abstract psychedelic virtual reality work as part of the performance programme of CHART. Trained at the Royal College of Art, Mullett is founder of VR agency Virtualize and has written about innovations in Virtual Reality for Dazed, Sleek and Blackbook.
Duncan Ransom is the founder of The Endless, a high-end Virtual Reality content creation studio. With over 10 years experience working for major VFX studios in the feature film industry, he is currently focused on the development of delicious augmented and virtual reality based environments, interactions and applications.

SUNDAY the 23rd of August

Swedish artist Nadine Bryne creates works that reflect an interest in ritual, nature and femininity. Alongside a practise that includes sculpture and film, her performance works have incorporated textiles, dance and fabric elements. For CHART, she will create audio-visual work inspired by the projection and contrast of colour.

Verhoeven’s chaotic performative installation works include objects, sound, sculpture, moving image and painting. She has also created collaborative real time performances at the ICA, London and moving image performance with Jimmy Merris at the Hordaland Arts Centre, Norway. She is creating a new performance inspired by the colour spectrum for CHART.

Peter Jensen was born in Denmark and educated at Central Saint Martins in London. He established his brand in 1999 and is known for a mastery of colour and print, with work that crosses between fashion, art and graphic image. He has collaborated in the past with Tim Walker, Dover Street Market and Topshop, and a retrospective of his work was exhibited at the Copenhagen Arts Museum in 2011. 

Spectrum Risograph Print Project
This commissioned project is a series of six limited risograph prints each inspired by a different colour in the spectrum, which will be given away free. The project aims to rethink ideas of value and consumption within the context of the fair with works that explore wider ideas about the colour spectrum. The contributing artists are Alex da Corte, Clare Woods, James Hoff, John Korner, Peter Linde Busk and Richard Coleman.

Francesca Gavin
Gavin is a curator, writer and editor based in London. She has curated international exhibitions including E-Vapor-8 (319 Scholes and Site Sheffield), The Dark Cube (Palais de Tokyo), and The New Psychedelia (Mu). She is also the Visual Arts Editor of Dazed & Confused, Art Editor of Twin and contributing editor at, Sleek, Le Pan and AnOther. She has written five books including ‘The Book of Hearts’, ‘100 New Artists’ and ‘Hell Bound: New Gothic Art’ and is the curator of the Soho House group collection.

Monday, May 25, 2015

Nazafarin Lotfi: Indexical Realness

Nazafarin Lotfi: Indexical Realness
May 29-July 12015, ClubMonaco, 58 Main St, South Hampton, NY
Curated by Francesca Gavin

Nazafarin Lotfi is an artist with a nuanced approach to abstraction, texture and tone. Born in Iran, Lotfi is based in Chicago where she completed her MFA in Fine Arts. Her work has been exhibited in Milan, Chicago, Seoul, Budapest and New York.

Lofti began working on this series of small-scale paintings in 2010 alongside larger works, increasingly attracted to their intimacy. Part of what makes them so interesting is their focus on texture. “References of time passing on the surfaces of things always intrigued me,” the artist explains. “It was a reward to find the layers of dust in the corners of my bedroom or kitchen, all the places that I didn’t reach. When I rented a studio the marks left from the previous artists or the rubbed and worn floors were always fascinating. They are so much about a lived experience that is not present at the moment and these residues focus your attention to their thing-ness. I wanted to create that in my paintings.”

Her reduced color palette to a spectrum of monochrome tones is part of what makes the results so interesting and surprisingly broad. “I needed to focus and pay attention to what was in front of me. Then all the possibilities of different grays opened up and it became about all the colors between black and white.” When making the work, Lotfi covers her canvases in black and paints over this white, layering and sanding each layer when dried for weeks. Some pieces included found elements from her studio – old drawings, cut papers. Here the image itself reflects the process of addition and removal. As she notes, “I wanted to spend time with the work and do an activity- the traces of my presence and touch is left on the surfaces.”

The presentation of the work was something conceived by the artist. “I like how the paintings coexist together. They are all part of a larger entity but can also function on their own.” Sculpture is the serious focus of Lotfi’s work outside of these paintings – influenced by vessels, ritualistic objects and the work of artists like Franz West and Jessica Jackson Hutchins. Recent piece include paper molds of everyday objects with a surface relating to her textured 2D pieces. Her practice as a whole reflects an intelligent take on the abstract. “Abstraction came to me as a world of possibility, in some ways liberating and opening. We usually tend to go for the narrative, that is how we understood the world at the first place but I think we should move forward and learn to live without it.” This is work about experience itself.; text and curation Francesca Gavin

For enquiries contact

Images from top: All courtesy ofthe artist
Untitled (2012) Mixed media on canvas

Sunday, May 24, 2015